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If you post content that is copyrighted by others without their permission, they can, at least in theory, sue you for it.Once again, it is an infringement even if it was only distributed to a few of your friends, though that makes it much less likely that a copyright holder will sue.Social networking has been a boon for most Web users, allowing even the most non-tech savvy people a chance to connect with friends, publish photos and generally have a presence online.With some 500 million active users on Facebook, it is by far the largest social network and it has given a voice to millions who never would have even considered publishing online otherwise.I explained that I manage a variety of pages for clients, and was always mindful about the content I posted – after all, my parents are on Facebook too.After sending the email to Facebook, I sent an email to the friends who’s email addresses I actually had and explained what happened.But while this has been a boon in many ways, most people are not familiar with mass media law and those who are often don’t see social networking as “publishing” worthy of such contemplation.

The suits and threats are rare now as much of the infringement likely is private but as Facebook opens up, so will the searches for copyrighted material and, along with it, the takedown filings and lawsuits.In the end, Facebook is not much different legally than blogging and that’s because, in many ways, the two acts are very similar.The only difference being that Facebook favors shorter posts to a (theoretically) smaller audience.I found some articles by famous bloggers or journalists, including Roger Ebert, Robert Scoble, and Stan Shroeder (Mashable).Many of these high-profiled Facebook users had their profiles and/or pages reabled soon after Facebook discovered who they disabled. Reading these articles didn’t instill much hope in me or my situation.

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